OREGON - US West coast State. A sample taken from the list.

Ship Name: Baltimore
-mm/dd/yyyy: ??/??/1861
Description: Wooden Hull
Lat: N:043.21.03
Long: W:124.23.00
Last Known Location: Oregon
Vessel Type: Schooner
Nationality: American
O/S File:
Data:
Wrecked on Baltimore Rocks. ...................

Baltimore (Schooner) - 1861 Schooner. Wreck was discovered on the rocks 0.6 mile northwest of Cape Arago Light. Half of the ship lay in Lat. 43 degrees 21'03,'N, Lon. 124 degrees 23'00 "W. Her stern appeared at a place known as "Tunnel Point." Very little else is known of this wreck. Don Marhsall, "Ship Disasters, Blacklock Point to Tenmile Creek. Portland: Binford and Mort, 1984, p.42-46 ..................


Ship Name: Bandon
-mm/dd/yyyy: ??/??/????
Description:
Lat: N:043.22.00
Long: W:124.12.00
Last Known Location: Oregon
Vessel Type: Steamer
Nationality: American
O/S File:
Data:
Grounded several times at Coos Bay before being sold.


Ship Name: Bandorille
-mm/dd/yyyy: 11/21/1895
Description: Woodden Hull
Lat: N:043.40.00
Long: E:124.12.00
Last Known Location: Oregon
Vessel Type: Schooner
Nationality: American
O/S File:
Data:
Stranded near Umpqua River. ........................

BANDORILLE (Steam schooner) - The steam schooner George H. Chance was lengthened and renamed the Bandorille. Her dimensions are, length one hundred and four feet, beam
twenty-one feet, and depth of hold eight feet, with engines eight and one-half and sixteen by twelve inches. Capt. J. J. Winant has handled her since completion, with John E. Kane,
engineer. E. W. Wright. "Growth of Deep-water Commerce, Great Loss of Life by Marine Disasters," Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York:
Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961. [Wright completed his book in 1895 and the events described occurred in 1893 and 1894.]., p.409. ..............

BANDORILLE (Steamer) - November 21, 1895 Coastal steamer, ex-George H. Chance, re-built in 1893, 1041 x 21'x 8', engine 8 1/2 " and 16 " x 12 '. Wrecked on the Umpqua bar,
crew and one passenger rescued by Life Saving Service. One dead. Don Marshall, "Ship disasters, Umpqua River to Salmon River. Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland: Binfords and
Mort, 1984, p. 72-75. ............................

BANDORILLE (Steamer) - The coastal steamer Bandorille went ashore while crossing out over the Umpqua bar on Nov. 21, 1895 and became a total loss, the captain being washed overboard and drowned. The crew of nine and one passenger were landed safely by the life-saving service. The Bandorille was originally the steam schooner George H. Chance and was renamed in 1895. Gordon Newell, "Casualties, 1895," H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. xiii. ...............


Ship Name: Barge No 14
-mm/dd/yyyy: 01/15/1956
Description:
Lat: N:042.25.00
Long: W:124.25.00
Last Known Location: Oregon
Vessel Type: Barge
Nationality: American
O/S File:
Data:
1,473 tons. Stranded off Rogue River Bar.


Ship Name: Baroda
-mm/dd/yyyy: 08/29/1901
Description: Wooden Hull
Lat: N:043.07.00
Long: W:124.24.00
Last Known Location: Oregon
Vessel Type: Barkentine
Nationality: American
O/S File:
Data:
Stranded at Bandon. Refloated. Converted into barge.


Ship Name: Battle Abbey
-mm/dd/yyyy: 12/18/1914
Description:
Lat:
Long:
Last Known Location: Oregon
Vessel Type: Barkentine
Nationality: British
O/S File:
Data:
BATTLE ABBEY (Bark) - December 18, 1914 Bark, British. She burned at sea off the Columbia River. A German ship rescued the crew. The Battle Abbey was owned by James Rolph, Jr. Don Marshall, "Ship disasters, Cape Falcon to Cape Disappointment," Oregon Shipwrecks. 1984, p. 127-34. .........................

BATTLE ABBEY (Bark) - The British bark Battle Abbey, owned by James Rolph, Jr., burned at sea December 28 while en route for the Columbia River, the crew being picked up and taken to Astoria by the German bark Eilbek. Gordon Newell, "Maritime Events of 1914," H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.247. ....


Ship Name: Bawnmore
-mm/dd/yyyy: 08/28/1895
Description: Steel Hull
Lat: N:043.07.00
Long: W:124.26.00
Last Known Location: Oregon
Vessel Type: Steamer
Nationality: British
O/S File:
Data:
Stranded South of Coquille River. ..................

BAWNMORE (Steamer) - August 28, 1895 Steamer, British. En route Nanaimo-Peru when she went ashore in the fog and wrecked 15 miles south of Bandon. Don Marhsall, "Ship Disasters, Blacklock Point to Tenmile Creek. Portland: Binford and Mort, 1984, p.42-46. ..............

BAWNMORE (Steamer) - The British steamer Bawnmore, from Nanaimo for Peru, went ashore in the fog about ten miles south of Bandon, Oregon, August 28, 1895. Gordon Newell, "Casualties, 1895," H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. xiii ..............................



Ship Name: Bay Center
-mm/dd/yyyy: ??/??/1883
Description:
Lat: N:046.12.00
Long: W:123.45.00
Last Known Location: Oregon
Vessel Type: Steamer
Nationality: American
O/S File:
Data:
BAY CENTER (Steamer) - The steamer Bay Center was completed at Montesano in 1883, and the propeller Gleaner at Gray's River by Capt. Peter Jordan, who operated her for five years, when she capsized off Tongue Point, drowning several passengers. E. W. Wright, "Marine business of 1883," Lewis and Drydens Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. [Written in 1895]. , p. 308. .......................


Ship Name: Bear
-mm/dd/yyyy: 12/12/1950
Description:
Lat: N:045.30.00
Long: W:122.40.00
Last Known Location: Oregon
Vessel Type: Tug
Nationality: American
O/S File:
Data:
BEAR - The Shaver Transportation Co. tug Bear was swamped by the propeller wash of the Panamarilan freighter Falcon and sank in 65 feet of water at Portland in December. The tug was later raised by a large floating crane of the Portland Commission of Public Docks. Gordon Newell, "Maritime Events of 1950-51," H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle Superior Publishing Company, 1966.. p. 575. ..................

Bear (Tugboat) - December 12, 1950. Tug, owned by the Shaver Transportation Co. and skippered by Claude Burleson, built in 1947. While towing the Falcon she went under near the Hawthorne Bridge in 50'of water. Don Marshall, "Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208 ...............


Ship Name: Bear
-mm/dd/yyyy: 02/20/????
Description:
Lat:
Long:
Last Known Location: Oregon
Vessel Type: Fishing Vessel
Nationality: American
O/S File:
Data:
Bear (Fishboat) - The Bear, a small motor fishing vessel, lost at sea after leaving Tillamook for Ilwaco February 20 in 50-mile winds and 35 foot seas, the owner, Roy Burgess and his son being drowned. Gordon Newell. The H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 690-91. ...............


Ship Name: Beaver
-mm/dd/yyyy: 08/03/1940
Description:
Lat: N:046.13.00
Long: W:124.00.00
Last Known Location: Oregon
Vessel Type: Prop Driven
Nationality: American
O/S File:
Data:
15 tons. Wrecked at Clatsop Spit. .........................

BEAVER (Freight boat) - Beaver, 14 -ton gasoline freight boat built at Astoria in 1911 and owned by Edward A. McGrath, Jr of that port, stranded on Clatsop Spit Columbia River entrance, August 3, 1940, Gordon Newell, "Maritime Events of 1940," H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 484. ......................


Ship Name: Beda
-mm/dd/yyyy: 03/17/1886
Description: Wooden Hull
Lat: N:044.17.00
Long: W:124.56.00
Last Known Location: Oregon
Vessel Type: Schooner
Nationality: American
O/S File:
Data:
370 tons. Built in 1883 by Kruse & Banks, North Bend. Owned by Simpson R.W., Ulverston. Foundered 40 miles W of Cape Perpetua, OR. .................

BEDA (Schooner) - March 17,1886 Steam schooner, 300 tons, built at North Bend by John Kruse in 1883. While bound from Knappton to San Francisco with Captain P. Halley in command, the ship began taking on water some 40 miles west of Cape Perpetua. The pumps failed and the rising water doused her fires. The crew jettisoned the deck load to no avail. At 3:20 in the stormy afternoon, 18 men put off in three boats. At first they connected their boats with lines, but those quickly chaffed. Two men in one boat died from exposure and two in the second boat drowned when it capsized in the surf. The third boat simply disappeared. Don Marshall, "Ship disasters, Umpqua River to Salmon River. Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1984, p. 72-75. .......................

BEDA (Steamer) - Captian A. M. Simpson added the steamship Bed to his extensive fleet in 1883. The steamer Beda was about three hundred tons burden and was operated until 1886, at which time she was lost. E. W. Wright, "Marine business of 1883," Lewis and Drydens Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 309. ..........




Ship Name: Bella
-mm/dd/yyyy: 11/25/1905
Description: Wooden Hull
Lat: N:044.08.00
Long: W:124.07.00
Last Known Location: Oregon
Vessel Type: Schooner
Nationality: American
O/S File:
Data:
180 tons. Stranded at Ocean Beach. Also listed 1906. .................

BELLA (Schooner) - November 25, 1905 Schooner, three masts, 180 tons, built at Acme, Oregon, by William Kyle. Ship was totalled at Ocean Beach, Oregon. Berwick 3/13/1908 Two mast, 100-ton schooner, gas. Built by M. Turner at Benicia in 1887. A total loss at the Siuslaw. Don Marshall, "Ship disasters, Umpqua River to Salmon River. Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1984, p. 72-75. ........................

BELLA (Schooner) - Vessels lost off the Northwest coast included the schooner Bella, stranded at Ocean Beach, Oregon November 25, 1905. ................ Gordon Newell, "Maritime Events of 1905," H.W. McCurdy. Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.. p. 114. .......................

BELLA (Schooner) - The Bella, a shoal draft schooner, probably two-masted, 180 tons. was built at Acme, Ore., in 1896 for owners in Yaquina. No record of her fate has been found. John Lyman, "Pacific Coast Built sailers, 1850-1905," The Marine Digest. Feb. 22, 1941.p. 2 Mr. Lyman later wrote that the Bella was a three masted schooner owned by William M. Kyle of Yaquina. She was wrecked at Ocean Beach, Oregon, November 25, 1906. .............................

BELLA (Schooner) - The three-masted schooner Bella, a 180-ton shallow-draft vessel for operation by William M. Kyle of Yaquina, was completed at Acme, Oregon. Gordon Newell, "Maritime Events of 1896," H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 4. ..................




Ship Name: Bella
-mm/dd/yyyy: 12/??/1920
Description:
Lat: N:042.43.00
Long: W:124.30.00
Last Known Location: Oregon
Vessel Type:
Nationality:
O/S File:
Data:
Foundered near Port Orford


Ship Name: Bertha
-mm/dd/yyyy: 03/??/1950
Description:
Lat: N:043.22.00
Long: W:124.12.00
Last Known Location: Oregon
Vessel Type:
Nationality:
O/S File:
Data:
Stranded at Coos Bay Jetty


Ship Name: Berwick
-mm/dd/yyyy: 03/13/1908
Description: Wooden Hull
Lat: N:044.01.00
Long: W:124.08.00
Last Known Location: Oregon
Vessel Type: Prop Driven
Nationality: American
O/S File:
Data:
100 tons. Stranded on Siuslaw River Bar. .......................

BERWICK (Schooner) - The Berwick, a two - masted schooner of 100 tons, was built at Benicia in 1887 by Turner, and owned in San Francisco till after 1900.John Lyman, "Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905," The Marine Digest. Mar. 1, 1941. , p. 2. ........................

BERWICK (Schooner) - On March 13 the gasoline schooner Berwick, from Astoria for Florence to pick up a cargo of salmon, went ashore near the mouth of the Siuslaw River on the Oregon coast, the crew getting ashore safely. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1908, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 154. ........


Ship Name: Besse
-mm/dd/yyyy: 07/23/1886
Description: Wooden Hull
Lat: N:046.16.00
Long: W:124.04.00
Last Known Location: Oregon
Vessel Type: Barkentine
Nationality:
O/S File:
Data:
BESSE (Bark) - 1,300 ton vessel wrecked on Peacock Spit, July 23, 1886. Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard, p. 187. ......................


Ship Name: Bessie K
-mm/dd/yyyy: 02/21/1907
Description: Wooden Hull
Lat:
Long:
Last Known Location: Oregon
Vessel Type: Schooner
Nationality: American
O/S File:
Data:
98 tons. Capsized on Coquille River. ......................

BESSIE K (Gas schooner) - February 25, 1907 Gas schooner, 98 gross tons, 84 net, 84'x 26'x 7', built at Alameda, California in 1893, owned by Charles C. Horton. This is the vessel that searched so long in vain for the missing City of Rio de Janeiro near San Francisco. The vessel, under Captain Louis Lazzarevich, carried 100,000' of lumber and 300,000 shingles when some mysterious occurrence caused the loss of her 10 man crew. The derelict drifted for several years and was sighted many times, a mute testimony to the vagaries of the sea. Don Marshall, "Missing at Sea," Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland: Binford and Mort, 1984, p. 183-186. .........................

BESSIE K (Schooner) - About February 25 the gasoline schooner Bessie K of San Francisco, Coquille River for San Francisco with lumber, encountered heavy seas off the coast and turned turtle, Capt. Lazzarevich and her crew of eight men being drowned. Gordon Newell, "Maritime Events of 1907," H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. p. 134. ...............................


Ship Name: Betty M
-mm/dd/yyyy: ??/??/????
Description:
Lat: N:046.16.00
Long: W:123.47.00
Last Known Location: Oregon
Vessel Type:
Nationality:
O/S File:
Data:
Wrecked at entrance to the Columbia River, OR.


Ship Name: Bismarck
-mm/dd/yyyy: ??/??/1898
Description: Sternwheel
Lat:
Long:
Last Known Location: Oregon
Vessel Type: Steamer
Nationality: American
O/S File:
Data:
191 tons. 104ft x 20ft. Stranded on Willamette River. .....................

BISMARCK (Steamer) - The Bismarck, one hundred and four feet long, twenty feet beam, and four feet four inches hold, with engines eleven by thirty-six inches, was completed in 1892 for the Lewis and Lake rivers trade. She was so poorly constructed that she soon bankrupted her builder and for the past two years has been jobbing around Portland in charge of a receiver. E. W. Wright, "Retirement of the Oregon Railway and Navigation Company from Puget Sound," Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Puget Sound. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was written in 1895 and the years covered in this chapter are 1891 and 1892., p.400-01. ....................

BISMARCK (Steamer) - The stern -wheel steamer Bismark, a lightly-constructed vessel built at Portland in 1892 for the Lewis and Lake Rivers trades, broke up and sank on the Willamette River, only her machinery being salvaged. Gordon Newell, "Maritime Events of 1898. H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. p. 42. ...........

BISMARCK (Sternwheeler) - 1898 Sternwheeler, 104'x 20'x 4.4', engine 11 " x 361, 191 tons, built in 1892 at Woodland, Washington and supposedly very poorly constructed. She went for a total loss on the Willamette for unknown reasons. Don Marshall, "Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208. ................


Ship Name: Blanco
-mm/dd/yyyy: ??/??/1864
Description: Wooden Hull
Lat: N:044.55.00
Long: W:124.02.00
Last Known Location: Oregon
Vessel Type: Brigantine
Nationality: American
O/S File:
Data:
BLANCO (Brig) - The Blanco, brig of 284 tons old measurement and 200 new, was built at North Bend, Ore., in 1858, 1860 or 1861, according to different accounts. She was built for A. M. Simpson by his brother, Ebbridge, who came out from Maine for the purpose, and cost $15,000. In 1864 she was lost by capsizing off Siletz, Wash. John Lyman, "Pacific Coast Built Sailers, 1850-1905," The Marine Digest. Mar. 1, 1941. , p. 2. ...........................

BLANCO (Brig) - 1864 Supposedly this vessel was the first brig built at Coos Bay. Simpson completed the job in 1859. She registered 284 tons, two masts, square rigged. The 125'vessel capsized off the Siletz River and drifted in keel-up with her masts gone, deck broken and hull split from rail to keel. The local Indians claimed ignorance of the wreck, but had in their possession five sheets of zinc, two kegs of nails, an oilskin coat, a calico dress, seven pairs of garters, two pair of boots and a lot of sail and rope. The crew was never found. Don Marshall, "Ship disasters, Umpqua River to Salmon River. Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1984, p. 72-75. ................

Wreckage found near the mouth of the Siletg River in 1864. Peterson, Emil R. A Century of Coos and Curry, p. 407. ..... Siletz River ?... This vessel may be named BLANCO.


Ship Name: Blancoze
-mm/dd/yyyy: ??/??/1864
Description:
Lat: N:044.54.00
Long: W:124.01.00
Last Known Location: Oregon
Vessel Type: Brigantine
Nationality: American
O/S File:
Data:
284 tons. Wrecked at mouth of Siletz River


Ship Name: Bonanza
-mm/dd/yyyy: 11/11/1888
Description: Sternwheel
Lat:
Long:
Last Known Location: Oregon
Vessel Type: Steamer
Nationality: American
O/S File:
Data:
Stranded at Wallings, Willamette River. ....................

BONANZA - The Bonanza, an old-timer on the Willamette, struck a rock while landing at Wallings, above Portland, November 11th, and sank in twelve feet of water. As she was old and tender she was stripped of her machinery and abandoned. E. W. Wright, "Large Increase in British Columbia's Inland and Ocean Steam Fleet," Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd.,1961 [Wright originally wrote in 1895. Events in this chapter occurred in 1888.]., p.360. .........................................

BONANZA (Steamer) - The Oregon Steamship Company replaced the steamer Albany, lost the preceding year, with the Bonanza, launched at Oregon City in July, making her trial trip August 7, 1875. Capt. J. D. Tackaberry was her first master. A year later she sank at Rock Island, remaining submerged for three months before she was raised and repaired. After passing into the hands of the Oregon Steam Navigation Company, she found steady employment on the Willamette until 1888, when, in command of her first master, she struck a sunken rock while making a landing at Wallings and went to the bottom. The machinery was saved, but the boat passed out of existence. James Wilson, Miles Bell and L. A. Bailey are the best known among her commanders. E. W. Wright, "Loss of the 'Pacific,' New Transportation Companies on the Willamette and Columbia," Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.231-2. ......................

Bonanza (Sternwheeler) - 1888 Sternwheeler, 651 tons, 152' long, owned by Oregon Steam Navigation Co., built in 1875 at Oregon City to replace the Albany. She sank once at Rock Island where she stayed under three months before being raised. She then went down for the count after hitting a rock at Wallings on the Willamette, and was stripped and abandoned. Don Marshall, "Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208. ...............................


Ship Name: Bonita
-mm/dd/yyyy: 12/07/1892
Description: Sternwheel
Lat: N:045.34.00
Long: W:122.07.00
Last Known Location: Oregon
Vessel Type: Steamer
Nationality: American
O/S File:
Data:
Stranded on Fashion Reef. ..........................

BONITA (Steamer) - The steamer Bonita, Capt. Gus Pillsbury, from Portland for the Cascades, was sunk on Fashion Reef, December 7th. She was caught in a heavy gale and struck broadside on, tearing a big hole in the hull. After several days spent in attempts to raise her she was abandoned, and on the fifteenth her machinery was removed. E. W. Wright, "Retirement of the Oregon Railway and Navigation Company from Puget Sound," Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Puget Sound. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was written in 1895 and the years covered in this chapter are 1891 and 1892., p.406. ...............................

BONITA (Steamer) - The Oregon Steam Navigation Company launched the fine steamer Bonita in March, 1875, for the lower river trade. She made her trial trip April 22d. Capt. George Pease had command for the first year, and in 1876, during the seaside rush, she was put on the Astoria route as a special night boat, with a passenger rate of five dollars. Capt. George Ainsworth ran her to Kalama and Astoria in 1877, and for the next five years she was in charge of Captain Babbidge on the same route. Capt. John Wolf afterward ran her to the Cascades. As finer boats appeared, the Bonita was withdrawn from the passenger traffic except for occasional trips, but, when the Wide West became too old and expensive for the Cascade run, the Bonita was placed in that service. While in command of Capt. A. B. Pillsbury she was wrecked on Fashion Reef during a severe windstorm, December 7, 1892. Unsuccessful efforts were made to float her, and she was finally dismantled. The Bonita was one hundred and fifty-five feet long, thirty feet beam, six feet hold, with engines sixteen by seventy-two inches. E. W. Wright, "Loss of the 'Pacific,' New Transportation Companies on the Willamette and Columbia," Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.232. ...........................................

BONITA (Sternwheeler) - December 7, 1892 Sternwheel, 527 tons, 155' long. She encountered a gale while en route Portland and Cascades and driven upon Fashion Reef. The 17 year old vessel under Captain Gus Pillsbury became a total loss. Don Marshall, "Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208. ....................................


Ship Name: Bordeaux
-mm/dd/yyyy: 12/13/1852
Description: Wooden Hull
Lat: N:046.13.00
Long: W:124.00.00
Last Known Location: Oregon
Vessel Type: Brigantine
Nationality: American
O/S File:
Data:
250 tons. Stranded on Clatsop Beach. Bound Puget Sound to San Francisco. .......................

BORDEAUX (Brig) - December 13, 1852 Brig. En route from San Francisco to Puget Sound, the ship broke from her temporary anchorage at the bar and was totalled on Clatsop Spit. Don Marshall, "Ship disasters, Cape Falcon to Cape Disappointment," Oregon Shipwrecks. 1984, p. 127-34. ............................

BORDEAUX (Brig) - American brig, 250 tons, was wrecked on Clatsop Spit, December 13, 1852. The disaster occurred while the vessel was bound for San Francisco from Puget Sound. She ran into the Columbia River for an unscheduled call and fell victim to the currents when the wind died on the bar. The crew walked ashore on dry sand, but the vessel was later demolished in the surf. James Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1950, p. 153-190. .................................

BORDEAUX (Brig) - "An American vessel, 250 tons, wrecked on Clatsop Spit in 1852." Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard, p. 157 ......................................

BORDEAUX (Brigantine) - William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 3. ............................................


Ship Name: Bostonian
-mm/dd/yyyy: 10/01/1850
Description: Wooden Hull
Lat: N:043.40.00
Long: W:234.12.00
Last Known Location: Oregon
Vessel Type: Sail
Nationality: American
O/S File:
Data:
Stranded on Umpqua Bar. Owned by a man named Gardiner, much of the vessel was salvaged and used in the building of the town of Gardiner, Oregon. .....................

BOSTONIAN - October 1850 Captain Coffin, with supercargo George Snelling (nephew of Boston merchant and owner Mr. Gardiner), sailed the vessel from Boston to the Pacific Northwest. She wrecked at the mouth of the Umpqua. Some of her cargo was removed and a sail-tent city set up. A portion of the ship's stores went upriver to Levi Scott, who founded Scottsburg. The wreck floated around the bay for some time before eventually grounding opposite the present site of Gardiner; much of her went into the early construction of that town. Don Marshall, "Ship disasters, Umpqua River to Salmon River. Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1984, p. 72-75. .............


Ship Name: Brandon
-mm/dd/yyyy: 04/??/????
Description:
Lat: N:044.36.00
Long: W:124.04.00
Last Known Location: Oregon
Vessel Type: Barge
Nationality: American
O/S File:
Data:
BRANDON (Barge) - The Brandon, a Sause Brothers ocean barge broke away from a company tug, capsized and went aground at Yaquina Bay in April. Gordon Newell. The H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 690-91. ................................


Ship Name: Brandon
-mm/dd/yyyy: 06/15/1889
Description:
Lat: N:045.51.00
Long: W:122.47.00
Last Known Location: Oregon
Vessel Type:
Nationality: American
O/S File:
Data:
BRANDON - June 15, 1889 Aground on St. Helens bar (Columbia River). Don Marshall, "Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon shipwrecks. 1984, p.203-208


Ship Name: Brant
-mm/dd/yyyy: 01/??/1862
Description: Wooden Hull
Lat:
Long:
Last Known Location: Oregon
Vessel Type: Schooner
Nationality: American
O/S File:
Data:
BRANT (Schooner) - 1862 Schooner, 50 tons. Captain Ben Olney drowned when the Brant capsized at Tillamook. Don Marshall, "Ship disasters from Cascade Head to Nehalem River,"Oregon Shipwrecks, 1985, p. 96-98. ........................

BRANT (Schooner) - A new schooner named the Brant was launched at Tillamook for the Portland trade, but was unfortunately wrecked shortly afterward. E. W. Wright, "The Oregon Steam Navigation Company's Best Days, Many New Steamers in Puget Sound Waters," Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.114. .................................

BRANT (Schooner) - The schooner Brant, of about fifty tons burden, built at Tillamook this year, was cast away, and the captain, Benjamin Olney, was drowned. The hull was afterward hauled up on the beach at Tillamook, and, after being repaired, was launched again. E. W. Wright, "The Oregon Steam Navigation Company's Best Days, Many New Steamers in Puget Sound Waters," Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.114. ..............................




Ship Name: Brenda Gail
-mm/dd/yyyy: 03/04/1966
Description:
Lat: N:042.43.00
Long: W:124.30.00
Last Known Location: Oregon
Vessel Type: Fishing Vessel
Nationality: American
O/S File:
Data:
BRENDA GAIL (Fishing vessel) - A number of small commercial fishing vessels were lost along the southern Oregon coast in 1966. The 12-ton Brenda Gail capsized at Port Orford on March 4, with the loss of one of the men aboard. The other reached shore supported by a fishbox which floated off the deck. Gordon Newell, "Maritime Events of 1966," H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1976, p.XXXI. ..............................


Ship Name: Brodich Castle
-mm/dd/yyyy: 12/31/1909
Description: Iron Hull
Lat: N:046.16.00
Long: W:124.04.00
Last Known Location: Oregon
Vessel Type: Ship
Nationality: British
O/S File:
Data:
1,820 tons. Foundered off Columbia River, OR. Cargo of barley. Built in 1875 at Whiteinch, Scotland. #71743. Home port Victoria, BC. Had sailed from Astoria. Also spelt Brodick Castle. Some lists show date lost as 1908.

BRODICK CASTLE (Grain Ship) - December 1908 British grain ship. Wrecked on Peacock Spit. Don Marshall, "Ship disasters, Cape Falcon to Cape Disappointment," Oregon Shipwrecks. 1984, p. 127-34. ....................................

BRODICK CASTLE - British ship, 1,820 tons, disappeared with all hands after departing the Columbia River, December, 1908. She is believed to have foundered in a gale. James Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1950, p. 153-190. ..............................................

BRODICK CASTLE - British vessel. 1820 tons disappeared with all hands off the Columbia River in December of 1908. Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard, p. 157. ........................

BRODICK CASTLE (Steamer) - The British iron ship Brodick Castle, 1,820 tons, built by T. Wingate at Glasgow in 1875, was transferred to Victoria registry, operating under the management of Hind, Rolph & Co. of San Francisco. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1904, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. ....................


Ship Name: Brush
-mm/dd/yyyy: 04/26/1923
Description: Steel Hull
Lat: N:043.19.00
Long: W:124.30.00
Last Known Location: Oregon
Vessel Type: Steamer
Nationality: American
O/S File:
Data:
5,115 tons. Stranded off Cape Arago. Lying in 300ft of water. ...................................

BRUSH (Steamer) - April 26, 1923 Steamer. A 5,543 gross ton ship belonging to NA&W Steamship Co. She struck on the north side of the reef just off Sunset Beach near Cape Arago where she quickly settled and broke up. Lat. 43 degrees 19'00 ", Lon. 124 degrees30'00 1. Don Marhsall, "Ship Disasters, Blacklock Point to Tenmile Creek. Portland: Binford & Mort, 1984, p.42-46 ...................................

BRUSH (Steamer) - The steamer Brush stranded near Cape Arago on April 16 while on a voyage from Aberdeen for San Francisco. The tug Oregon attempted without success to free her, and she finally broke up after all hands were safely removed. Gordon Newell, "Maritime Events of 1923," H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest p. 343. .................................................


Ship Name: Bully Washington
-mm/dd/yyyy: 12/12/1857
Description: Iron Hull
Lat:
Long:
Last Known Location: Oregon
Vessel Type: Steamer
Nationality: American
O/S File:
Data:
Filled in as the foundation of a dock at Scottsburg, Umpqua River, OR. ........

BULLY WASHINGTON - Iron-hulled, steamer, built in 1850 at San Francisco by Captain Alex S. Murray. She was shipped to the Columbia aboard the bark SUCCESS, then re-assembled above Oregon City and ran between Canemah and the mouth of the Yamhill; her first run was June 6, 1851. She later sold to Allen McKinley & Co. for $3,000 and taken below the falls for Oregon City-Portland service. She again sold, this time to Captain Sylvester Hinsdale who brought her to the Scottsburg-Gardiner run on the Umpqua. just after leaving the dock at Scottsburg, she suffered a fire and explosion. On December 12th 1857 the hull was moved to the north side of the Umpqua just below the highway bridge at Scottsburg, filled with rocks and converted into a dock. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Umpqua River to Salmon River. ..........Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1984, p. 72-75.


Ship Name: Bulwark
-mm/dd/yyyy: 02/27/1882
Description:
Lat:
Long:
Last Known Location: Oregon
Vessel Type: Ship
Nationality: British
O/S File:
Data:
1,332 tons. 198ft x 40ft. Foundered 300 miles off Oregon Coast. Built 1862 at St John, NB by Strom and King. Owned by Shaw, Saville Line. Operated as a New Zealand packet. ...................................................

BULWARK (Bark) - February 21, 1881 British bark went under 300 miles off the coast while bound for Puget Sound from Yokohama. She sprang a serious leak shortly after leaving Japan. The skipper promised the crew he would put in at Honolulu for much-needed repair. The captain was the only navigator aboard and chose to say nothing when the ship passed the islands headed directly for the Sound. The ship went to the bottom suddenly. Three men managed to get into one boat, two in another. The three crewmen, after great difficulty and suffering, managed to gain the Oregon coast near Empire City. The other two mariners were picked up by the Britisher Blackwell. The rest died. Don Marshall, "Missing at Sea," Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland: Binford and Mort, 1984, p. 183-186. .................................

BULWARK (Bark) - The British bark Bulwark, from Yokohama for Puget Sound, foundered at sea, February 27, 1882, about three hundred miles off the Oregon coast. The ship sprang a leak soon after leaving Japan, and the master promised to put into Honolulu but failed to do so, and she went down before she could reach her destination. Three of the crew reached Empire City, and two were picked up and taken to Melbourne by the British ship Blackwell, the remainder losing their lives. E. W. Wright, "Marine business of 1881," Lewis and Drydens Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 302. ................................


Ship Name: Bunkalation
-mm/dd/yyyy: 06/??/1870
Description: Wooden Hull
Lat: N:042.50.00
Long: W:124.33.00
Last Known Location: Oregon
Vessel Type: Schooner
Nationality: American
O/S File:
Data:
Wrecked at Cape Blanco. ......................

BUNKALATION (Schooner) - June 1870 American schooner stranded at Cape Blanco. A total loss, $7,000. Don Marshall, "Ship disasters, Oregon-California Border. Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1984, p. 26-28. ...........................


Ship Name: Buster
-mm/dd/yyyy: 10/17/1940
Description:
Lat: N:046.19.00
Long: W:124.07.00
Last Known Location: Oregon
Vessel Type: Barge
Nationality: American
O/S File: GPS
Data:
230 tons. Foundered 10 miles North of Astoria. .............................

BUSTER (Barge) - October 17, 1940 Barge, 230 tons, built in 1920. Foundered on the Columbia bar. Don Marshall, "Ship disasters, Cape Falcon to Cape Disappointment," Oregon Shipwrecks. 1984, p. 127-34. ...................................


Ship Name: Butcher
-mm/dd/yyyy: ??/??/????
Description:
Lat: N:044.37.00
Long: W:124.06.00
Last Known Location: Oregon
Vessel Type:
Nationality:
O/S File:
Data:
Sunk pre-WW2. No other particulars